Vaccinations

Cats

Rabies

Rabies is a deadly disease transmitted through the bite of an infected animal, through saliva or brain/nervous system tissue. It is only transmitted by coming in contact with these specific bodily fluids and tissues. Any animal bitten or scratched by a wild, carnivorous mammal or bat is considered to have been exposed to rabies. Unvaccinated animals exposed to rabies should be euthanized immediately due to the severity of this disease. If you are unwilling to have this done, the animal will need to be in strict isolation for 6 months and vaccinated one month before release. Rabies causes aggressive behavior, paralysis, and death. Rabies is a zoonotic disease, meaning that it is transferrable to humans. There is no treatment for this disease, and it is always fatal. This is the only vaccine that is required by law.

Vaccine Schedule:

  • 1st vaccine – 12 weeks of age
  • 2nd vaccine and every vaccine thereafter – annually
FVRCP

This vaccine helps protect against Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Calicivirus, and Panleukopenia, also known as feline distemper.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis is an upper respiratory infection. It is also known as feline influenza. It is very contagious and can cause serious disease, such as pneumonia, especially in kittens. It is transmitted through direct contact, such as saliva.

Calicivirus is another common cause of respiratory infection in cats.

Panleukopenia is very closely related to the canine parvovirus, and acts in a similar fashion by attacking the gastrointestinal tract. It is transmitted through contact with the infected animal’s bodily fluids, as well as by fleas.

Vaccine Schedule:

  • 1st vaccine – 8 weeks of age
  • 2nd vaccine – 12 weeks of age
  • Over 12 weeks of age – annually
FeLV

This vaccine helps protect against Feline Leukemia Virus. This is a contagious RNA retrovirus that can severely inhibit a cat’s immune system. It is a very commonly diagnosed cause of death and disease in domestic cats. This disease is most commonly transmitted through direct contact such as mutual grooming or fight wounds. It can also be transmitted via a mother’s milk.

Vaccine Schedule:

  • 1st vaccine – 8 weeks of age
  • 2nd vaccine – 12 weeks of age
  • Over 12 weeks of age – annually

 

Dogs

Rabies

Rabies is a deadly disease transmitted through the bite of an infected animal, through contact from infected saliva or brain/nervous system tissue. It is only transmitted by coming in contact with these specific bodily fluids and tissues. Any animal bitten or scratched by a wild, carnivorous mammal or bat is considered to have been exposed to rabies. Unvaccinated animals exposed to rabies should be euthanized immediately due to the severity of this disease. If you are unwilling to have this done, the animal will need to be in strict isolation for 6 months and vaccinated one month before release. Rabies causes aggressive behavior, paralysis, and death. Rabies is a zoonotic disease, meaning that it is transmittable to humans. There is no treatment for this disease, and it is always fatal. This is the only vaccine that is required by law.

Vaccine Schedule:

  • 1st vaccine – 14-16 weeks of age
  • 2nd vaccine – 1 year after the first vaccine
  • 3rd vaccine and every vaccine thereafter – every 3 years unless required more often by local laws
Da2pp

This vaccine helps protect against four different diseases: Canine Distemper, Adenovirus Type 2, Parainfluenza, Canine Parvovirus.

Canine Distemper is a deadly disease characterized by respiratory complications and often neurological symptoms. This disease is difficult to treat, and if the animal survives, it faces a progressive deterioration of motor skills and mental abilities.

The Adenovirus type 2 virus and Parainfluenza virus cause infectious tracheobronchitis, or kennel cough. This disease is associated with harsh, dry coughing followed by gagging or retching. It can progress to fatal bronchopneumonia in puppies or chronic bronchitis in older animals. This disease is transmitted by inhalation of infectious airborne droplets.

Canine Parvovirus is a highly contagious disease that attacks rapidly producing cells, such as those lining the gastrointestinal tract. This illness is characterized by vomiting and profuse diarrhea that is often bloody. Animals infected with parvo need to be hospitalized to correct the dehydration and electrolyte imbalances that are associated with the vomiting and diarrhea. Parvo is shed in the stool in large amounts for up to several weeks following infection. It is transmitted by oral contact with the infected feces. It can be carried on nearly anything and stays in the environment for months if not disinfected properly.

Vaccine Schedule:

1st vaccine – 8 weeks of age

2nd vaccine – 12 weeks of age

3rd vaccine – 16 weeks of age

Over 16 weeks of age – annually

Bordetella

This vaccine helps protect against infection from Bordetella bronchiseptica, which is one cause of Kennel Cough.

Vaccine Schedule:

1st vaccine – 12 weeks of age

2nd vaccine – 16 weeks of age

Over 16 weeks of age – Intranasal vaccine every 6 months or Oral vaccine annually